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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 1, 2017 8:00am-8:31am GMT

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i have got a nice little friendly sheep here got it! hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson. at least 39 people are believed to have died in an attack on a packed nightclub in the turkish city of istanbul. almost 70 others are injured. the city's governor has described it as a terror attack. police are still looking for the gunman. good morning, it's sunday, ist january. also ahead. the prime minister theresa may calls for 2017 to be a year of unity after the vote to leave the eu, saying she'll work to get a brexit deal for everyone. the new year is welcomed in at events around the uk amid heightened security measures
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and thousands of extra police. the city of hull becomes the uk's second city of culture, we're there live to see how organisers plan to transform it. it all starts right here at 4pm this afternoon and this evening there will be a firework display with biggerfireworks than will be a firework display with bigger fireworks than the ones last night in london. meanwhile, they are getting ready to sing, dance, shake and much our way into 2017 with the massive london new year's day parade. in sport, premier league leaders chelsea beat stoke. the blues have now equalled arsenal's record of 13 consecutive wins in a single season. and matt has the weather. 2017 opened up cold and sunny to the
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northern half of the uk, cloudy, wet and increasingly cold further south. 0n the details coming up in a few minutes. good morning. first, our main story. at least 39 people have been killed, and many more injured, in an attack on a nightclub in the turkish city of istanbul. at least a dozen of the victims are known to be foreign nationals. the city's governor has said the gunman is still at large, and has described him as a terrorist. sheref ishler reports. a new year celebration turned into a massacre in turkey's largest city, istanbul. this time targeting a popular nightclub around 1:15am local time. reina is located on the banks of the bosporus in the trendy 0rtakoy district. it was hosting hundreds of people for a new year celebration. at least one assailant, believed to be dressed in a santa claus costume, randomly opened fire after shooting and killing a police officer at the door. media say some guests jumped into the cold water
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of the bosporus to escape. the confusion of those inside still visible after. translation: i had my back turned, my husband suddenly told me to get on the floor. a man ran inside, two or three people started firing. then there was this fog. i fainted at that moment until special forces took us out of there. they shot randomly, there were bodies lying on the floor. 2016 has been a terrible year for turkey. the eu candidate country has seen over 15 attacks and an attempted coup. public gatherings for new year's eve were already restricted with around 17,000 police on duty and the country already nervous. but, just as it entered 2017, turkey was reminded once again that tight security cannot always prevent such a determined attack. earlier, our correspondent in istanbul, mark lowen,
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said an attack had been anticipated and security stepped up. there were reports that a planned attack in ankara was foiled, a couple of days ago, a planned attack for new year's eve. there have been several intelligence warnings about plans for attacks in the country. including reports that there was a specific intelligence warning on a threat to reina nightclub. 17,000 police officers, and yet this brazen attack in the heart of the city, itjust shows you just how hard it is to try and stop these kind of attacks in a country that is huge, in a country that borders syria and iraq, where there are several different threats. turkey has had bombings by so—called islamic state in the last two years, by kurdish militants as well. we don't yet know who was behind this latest attack but it shows you how the country is really in the grip of this terrible wave of attacks, this wave of bombings,
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this wave of gun threats as well, and it is a very grim way to start 2017 for a country that was very keen to see 2016 behind it. elsewhere, and there was tightened security across the uk and around the world as events took place to celebrate the start of 2017. around 3,000 police officers were on patrol in london, as leanne brown reports. big ben chimes. the sky was lit up as big ben struck midnight. tens of thousands of people lined the thames to watch the new year spectacular in london, but among the crowded streets was a huge police presence. we always seek to learn the lessons from horrific events around the world, whether in berlin, nice or paris, last year. we can't let the allow the bad guys to spoil our way of life. happy new year, london! it wasn't just london
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with heightened security. with memories of the berlin lorry attack still fresh, security was also stepped up at celebrations across germany. new year's eve passed peacefully in australia, sydney was the first major city to start proceedings with a glittering display over their iconic harbour bridge. in dubai, fireworks shot from the sides of the world's tallest skyscraper in a lavish display. and in scotland, partygoers welcomed 2017 with the world famous hogmanay street party in edinburgh. fantastic, yes. brilliant, isn't it? first time here, absolutely enthralling. it was brilliant, absolutely brilliant. you know how to party up here! and protection once again in america where up to 2 million people are thought to have joined the new year's eve ball in time square.
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but some regions of the world are still waiting for that much anticipated stroke of midnight. theresa may has called for 2017 to be a year of unity and opportunity following the eu referendum, which she says has exposed the divisions in britain. in her new year message, the prime minister said she would work to secure a brexit deal for everyone, whether they'd voted to leave or remain. let's talk to our political correspondent chris mason. how difficult will she find it to negotiate what she describes as a brexit deal for everyone? good morning, happy new year. it is a colossal challenge for theresa may, because as you were saying and she acknowledges in her new year ‘s message, she has to keep onside those who voted remain and those who voted leave. she has to keep the
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country together. our language in this message is pretty striking. she talks about the referendum being a momentous decision, that it was to divisive in parts. this year comes the detail, the nitty—gritty of trying to work out exactly what brexit will look like. thank you very much. the archbishop of canterbury has also spoken of the divisions caused by the eu referendum. he's urging reconciliation, as our religious affairs correspondent martin bashir reports. surrendering to the demands of television lighting, the archbishop of canterbury prepares to deliver his new year's message in a familiar setting. justin welby returned to coventry, the city where he started out as a clergyman. a city whose wartime suffering and forgiveness, he says, serves as an example to the nation. the story of the city says so much that is true about britain at its best,
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about our courage standing up to tyranny, how we stand alongside the suffering and defeated, how we stand for human dignity and hope. the archbishop visited a drop—in centre for refugees, people he called a blessing to our way of life. and he drew his message to a close by focusing on an issue that has divided so much many parts of the country. the eu referendum was a tough campaign, and it has left division. but i know that if we look at our roots, our history and our culture in the christian tradition, if we reach back into what is best in this country, we will find a path towards reconciling the differences that have divided us. from coventry to canterbury, the archbishop believes that looking back will only help us prepare for the future. the london ambulance service says
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that its control room staff had to log calls with pens and paper ‘s overnight because of technicals problems. the difficult occurred between half past midnight and 5:15am. the service said its staff are trained to prepare for such problems and additional personnel we re problems and additional personnel were on duty to offer support. it said patients were prioritised as normal. hull has started its year as the uk city of culture. £32 million has been spent on a year—long programme. at this afternoon's opening event, eight city centre buildings will be turned into giant screens which will be used to retell the city's history. here's our arts correspondent, colin paterson. after three years of planning and preparation, the waiting is over. hull is the uk's city of culture. one of its most famous residents can hardly contain himself. it's lifted up the spirits of people. you can rebuild and regenerate and build the confidence of the people by culture, and the city of culture
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is what is now happening to hull. £32 million is being spent on a year—long programme of events which includes hosting the turner prize. what are you hoping the city of culture will achieve for hull? i want nationally and internationally people to see that this is a fantastic city with great stories, great people, and a lot to offer. because every city deserves its moment in the limelight. and 2017 is ours. it all starts at 4pm this afternoon, when buildings will be used as giant screens to retail hull's history. with one turning hollywood into hullywood. people here have recreated famous movie scenes. what are you really looking forward to about the year? the 1st of january, looking at the fireworks, i don't even have to move out of my room if i don't want to. i can stay and look at my living room window. it's amazing. it's not just about looking through the window but putting hull in the shop window.
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the aim, 1 million extra visitors in 2017. we willjoin colin live in hull in a few minutes. a new 12—sided £1 coin will enter circulation in march. the current coin will cease to be legal tender come 0ctober. the royal mint says that after 30 years, the coin needs changing to protect it from counterfeiters. new designs have been unveiled for the £2 coin and the 50 pence piece. the time is 8.10am. hgppy happy new year. let's find out some more about the overnight gun attack at a turkish nightclub. 0livier guitta is a security and counter—terrorism analyst and he's in our london newsroom. good morning. thank you forjoining
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us. good morning. thank you forjoining us. happy new year. sadly not a happy new year in istanbul and turkey. but this attack was anticipated? yes, unfortunately, really not a surprise, because both kurdish extremists and islamic state had made no secret that turkey was on their radar, and just yesterday, turkish counterterrorism forces arrested eight members of islamic state that were planning an attack on new year's eve. 17,000 police officers on duty last night in anticipation of this, how other turkish intelligence services, are they are effective at stopping these potential attacks? it is a difficult if you do not get the intelligence ahead of time because in the case of
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the nightclub, there was a police officer outside that was killed right away by the terrorist. so they have covered as much as possible with physical security, but as you clearly pointed out, the intel is where the real successor will lie. so they need to get their game up when it comes to getting information, infiltrating cells and doing all the legwork, if you will. turkey has experienced numerous terrorist attacks of different kinds in recent months, is there any way of knowing who was responsible at this stage? because of the target, it is likely that is a jihadist group rather than kurdish extremists, because it specifically focused on a mac, which we know is a target of —— on a nightclub, which is also the target of choice for
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islamic state and also because this is where foreigners were. islamic state is always try to cripple the economy of the country it attacks and tourism in turkey has been dismal in the past six months, and such an attack will make it even more difficult for the tourism industry to recover. and in your role as a safety consultant, are you advising your clients to avoid turkey? yes, very much so. turkey is a very problematic place in terms of terrorism and people should be well advised of knowing the risks when they go there. thank you for talking to us. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. live. a lovely day to get out and walk in
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the northern half of the country, furthered —— it is soggy in the south, heavy burst in the south, and it is getting colder. sleep and showers pushes into scotland and northern ireland later but lots of sunshine here. it will be chilly in the breeze and a cold night will follow. there could be some ice into tomorrow morning. turning clearer for all but the south coast as we go into the start of monday. get your walk—in tomorrow. sunshine around tomorrow, a few showers in the east and a few in the north—west later on. monday is looking try and bright. —— dry and bright. we're here on the bbc news channel until 9am this morning, and coming up in the next hour.
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the latest from istanbul. this joyous news channel. —— good morning. thank you for staying with us. we will be here until 9am and the click team will be looking back on some of the technology innovations of the past year in a few minutes time. it was obliterated by the blitz during the second world war, and a decade ago it was labelled the worst place to live in britain. but today hull becomes the uk city of culture. 0rganisers say the year long programme will change perceptions of it forever — our arts correspondent colin paterson is there to find out how.
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the sun is up, the raindrops falling but the spirits, no doubt, are pretty high on this new year's day? hgppy pretty high on this new year's day? happy new year. we are live in queen victoria square, where it will start at 4pm this afternoon when these buildings will be turned into giant screens. that is the maritime museum, another one which will be pa rt museum, another one which will be part of this opening event which is run by this man, sean mcallister, the bafta nominated film—maker. your opening event, apm, made in hull. it is quite a concept for people that haven't heard of it. please explain. it is celebrating 75 years of the city across a one mile trail across the city that people can take between 9pm and 10pm tonight, in the middle of which there will be a beautiful fireworks display. how important was it that the opening event was something that anyone could come too, that you didn't need a ticket for? i think it's very
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important because culture in hull for working—class ordinary people is very difficult. but this is something that is very tangible and open to everybody. now, there is a lady called linda who runs a pub here in the centre of hull. three yea rs here in the centre of hull. three years ago, her partner died and she took over dj in duties. every friday and saturday night, she would use his ipods and play music from the 50s and 605. one his ipods and play music from the 505 and 605. one of the organisers of made in the whole came in and thought, this lady knows how to dj. tonight, 5he thought, this lady knows how to dj. tonight, she will be dj in to 20,000 people. i went there last night to experience higher dj skills. how would you describe your dj 5kill5?
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there is no way to describe them. i'm nota there is no way to describe them. i'm not a dj. ijust play music in the pub and hopefully everybody is happy. the biggest crowd you've ever dj dem front of before? a full pub. that's it. maybe 100. can you believe you are going to be playing in front of 25,000 people? i'm going to go along and just do what i do here. which is? ipods and moving the switches. my biggest are sweet caroline and penny arcade. it will bea caroline and penny arcade. it will be a fantastic experience and i still can't quite, behind it. buti will cope. i was di5cu55ing still can't quite, behind it. buti will cope. i was discussing with her what her new dj name should be. i offered up dj landlady or dj ma5ter
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l. she was going towards the second. at exactly 2017, because of the line —— the year, there will be a fantastic fireworks display and for the whole 12 minutes, the music will be provided by act5 the whole 12 minutes, the music will be provided by acts from hull, so i would expect to hear the housemartin5, everything but the girland housemartin5, everything but the girl and more. the organisers he is only fireworks will be bigger than tho5e only fireworks will be bigger than those in london la5t only fireworks will be bigger than those in london last night. enjoy your day. i think it will be a long one but one to enjoy. so, they are raising the bar on the fireworks that took place in london la5t raising the bar on the fireworks that took place in london last night because ten5 that took place in london last night because tens of thousands of people gathered on the banks of the thames to ta ke gathered on the banks of the thames to take them. the capital's getting ready to hold its annual new year's day parade.
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breakfa5t'5john maguire is there, so let's find out what's going on. colin patter5on say5 colin patter5on says his fireworks are better than yours. colin patter5on says his fireworks are better than yourslj colin patter5on says his fireworks are better than yours. i know. he was really trying to get the whole hull ver5u5 london event going there, wasn't he? but does he have a marching band playing the theme from star wars? marching band playing the theme from starwars? i marching band playing the theme from star wars? i don't think so. this is the dame clement high school band from this america and a lot of the pa re nts of from this america and a lot of the parents of these children are from na5a. the new year's day parade 5ta rt5 na5a. the new year's day parade starts at midday today and the man responsible for organising it i am going to call in now. you are telling me earlier that you are happy it is raining. i am happy it is raining because apparently there will be a four hour rain window and if that's the case, it will be gone by the time the event starts. this event has been building and i5 absolutely huge. you have got people from all over the world. we have got
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about 8000 performers, 20 different countries represented. fabulous marching bands and cheerleaders like the ones behind us. i really exciting afternoon in prospect. we have also got a puppeteer here from creature event5. have also got a puppeteer here from creature eve nts. a have also got a puppeteer here from creature events. a raptor that will entertain. we also have the lord men of westminster with us. the elected mayor of london was saying la5t night that the fireworks, the events la5t night that the fireworks, the events last night were about london being open. is this the continuation of that? absolutely. we have performers from all over the world coming here in the heart of london. london is absolutely open. it will be fantastic. what sort of crowds do you get here? we can see the barrier i5 you get here? we can see the barrier is being 5etup you get here? we can see the barrier is being setup and we know it starts in piccadilly. we know it is a
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ma55ive event. in piccadilly. we know it is a massive event. it shocks me every yearjust how big an event it is. there will be hundreds of thousands of people out on the streets of westminster, all smiling. thank you, enjoy your day. just one of the marching bands here. we have also been entertained by cheerleaders. i can see whitehall and there is big ben behind me the river bank and whitehall behind me. seats being setup. it promises to be a very, very large event and i should say it i5 very large event and i should say it is very, very loud, so colin's fireworks might beat our5 but i can tell you, even the hou5emartins wouldn't be able to beat the volume we are getting from this marching band from the states this morning. john, thank you. john and colin
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rivalling each other but i'm not 5ure rivalling each other but i'm not sure those guys from alabama will quite believe they have walked around parliament square when they get home. something to tell their friends and relatives about back in the united states. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's 8.25. time now for a look at the newspapers. nazir afzal is a former chief prosecutor with the crown prosecution service and he's here to tell us what's caught his eye. thank you for coming in. we are talking politics this morning. there5a may gave a christmas message. she's also done a new year when? absolutely. i remember 2016 as if it was yesterday and what there5a may has done, the prime minister has done, is to comment on the year ahead by reflecting on the year that's just gone. she ahead by reflecting on the year that'sjust gone. she makes reference to jo cox's terrible
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murder and how we need to be more united. she makes reference to the fa ct united. she makes reference to the fact that obviously brexit has to be complied with and we have to make it happen. we have got i55ues complied with and we have to make it happen. we have got issues with foreign governments, president trump in three weeks' time. she is basically saying that the only way we can deal with this is to be united. that's not just we can deal with this is to be united. that's notjust about the 5296, united. that's notjust about the 52%, but the 48% who didn't want to leave the european union. they have to be factored into any negotiations that take place. but it is clearly going to be a very challenging year, not that the last one wasn't challenging. she demonstrates here that if we don't get together on this and we don't think together, we don't plan, then ultimately we will be in don't plan, then ultimately we will beina don't plan, then ultimately we will be in a very sorry state and she wa nts be in a very sorry state and she wants us to remember that we are better united a5 wants us to remember that we are better united as the united kingdom in orderfor u5 better united as the united kingdom in orderfor us to better united as the united kingdom in order for us to get the best deal. it will be an interesting year ahead, with chris grayling talking
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about warbling and over the years about warbling and over the years about the brexit, which i think he will. in5ide about the brexit, which i think he will. inside the mirror, there is a story about george michael, one of the many celebrities to pass away la5t the many celebrities to pass away last year. somebody said to me that there is probably a super bound up in heaven, what with david bowie, prince, george michael. from our perspective, one of the great things we have learnt about george michael i5 we have learnt about george michael is that a lot of celebrities have secrets that come out after their deaths that are 5alaciou5. in his ca5e, deaths that are 5alaciou5. in his case, we learn that he was a phenomenal philanthropist. he kept childline going, he gave that woman money for ivf, he has worked at homele55 5helter5. all those cases, it was only on the condition that he would not tell anyone that he was involved and engaged. tho5e organisations would not be alive today without the support that he gave them and that says a lot for the philanthropy of george michael and says a lot about the man. there i5a and says a lot about the man. there is a lot of admiration for him not
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ju5t is a lot of admiration for him not just in the mirror but in all the newspapers today. just in the mirror but in all the new5paper5 today. it is notjust about the music. i'm sure you grok for that as well. we felt we lost a little bit of ourselves when he passed away, but at the same time there is the recognition that his legacy will live on. tho5e organisations that he has funded would not be living without him. and a very private man, as you said. lot5 a very private man, as you said. lots of people would have been happy to ta ke lots of people would have been happy to take the adulation and the banks. the instant when he ran into the photo shop ten or 15 years ago, i worked with him. he had his demons. we all have our demons. but at the 5ame we all have our demons. but at the same time, he was clearly an angel when it came to funding tho5e causes that they needed it. that must have been a very interesting 5ituation, having grown up with his music. now, littering, apparently councils make
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about £30,000 a month with litter fines? very much so. it is suggested that some councils are now making more money from litterfines that some councils are now making more money from litter fine5 than they are from parking penalties and when it comes to parking penalties, there is the perception that it is a ca5h there is the perception that it is a cash cow for them, a money grabbing enterpri5e cash cow for them, a money grabbing enterprise in many cases. actually, litter has now become in some cases more lucrative to local authorities and therefore there was an example in maidstone where an enforcement officer gave a ticket to somebody that was giving bread to duck5 on a pond. a5 that was giving bread to duck5 on a pond. as a result, tho5e that was giving bread to duck5 on a pond. as a result, those individuals are being retrained. i think there i5 are being retrained. i think there is something to be said for it. we have to keep britain tidy, of course we do, but there is a balance to be struck a5 we do, but there is a balance to be struck as to whether you should financially penali5ed people who may not know what they are doing. financially penali5ed people who may not know what they are doingm financially penali5ed people who may not know what they are doing. it is really nice to see. thank you very indeed. please stay with us. the headlines are on the way. hello, this is breakfast
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with rogerjohnson. coming up before 9am we'll have a special 5easonal edition of click. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. at least 39 people have been killed, and many more injured, in an attack on a nightclub in the turkish city of istanbul. police are still looking for the gunman, who witne55e5 say opened fire at random. it's the latest in a wave of attacks and the city's governor has

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